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Conference Schedule


5/12/2017
Time
Session Title
7:15 AM - 8:15 AMRegistration & Networking Breakfast with Sponsors & Exhibitors
8:15 AM - 8:30 AMWelcome Announcements & Chapter Business Meeting
8:30 AM - 9:30 AMKeynote Address: Frustrated Care: Ethics & The Challenging/Noncompliant Adult Patient
9:30 AM - 10:15 AMNetworking Break with Sponsors & Exhibitors
10:15 AM - 11:15 AMSession 2: Going Beyond Money: Making Sense of Social Class to Improve Patient Care
11:20 AM - 12:20 PMSession 3: Driving Health Equity Through Care Teams
12:20 PM - 1:45 PMNetworking Lunch with Sponsors & Exhibitors
1:45 PM - 3:15 PMSession 4: Supported Decision Making: An Emerging & Ethical Alternative to Guardianship
3:30 PM - 4:30 PMSession 5: Implementing Primary-Specialty Care Coordination Partnerships for Complex CYSHN
4:30 PM - 4:45 PMClosing Remarks

Keynote Address: Frustrated Care: Ethics & The Challenging/Noncompliant Adult Patient

Thomas D. Harter, PhD
Director · Center for Bioethics, Humanities, and Advance Care Planning
Gundersen Medical Foundation · La Crosse, WI

ABSTRACT:

One challenging aspect of health care is the issue of patient noncompliance. Patient noncompliance occurs when – for any number of reasons – patients fail to act upon or cooperate with medical recommendations. This session explores the ethical contours of noncompliance. Focusing exclusively on adult patients, the presentation will examine some of the prevailing ethical concepts involved with patient noncompliance, boundary issues in caring for challenging/noncompliant patients, and obligations and strategies in caring for these patients.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  1. Understand some prevalent ethical concepts involved with patient noncompliance
  2. Describe some ethical boundary issues in caring for challenging/noncompliant patients
  3. Identify ethical obligations and strategies in caring for patients

Session 2: Going Beyond Money: Making Sense of Social Class to Improve Patient Care

Jennifer M. Cook, PhD, LPC, NCC
Assistant Professor · Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology
Marquette University · Milwaukee, WI

ABSTRACT:

All individuals have a social class identity, and that identity contributes to how individuals interact with and see the world. Yet cultural myths such as the United States is a classless society, that everyone is middle class, and those who are not middle class can pull themselves up by their bootstraps, can prevent helping professionals from acknowledging how social class impacts those with whom they work. Limited understanding and knowledge of what comprises social class and relegating social class to income factors only can stymie professional efforts and leave professionals confounded, and often times, blaming patients/clients when they do not comply. Through this presentation, participants will learn what social class is and how it functions, how social class bias might manifest in their work, and how to apply what they have learned about social class to improve patient/client outcomes.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  1. Define socioeconomic status and social class and how they function
  2. Describe basic facets of social class bias and classism
  3. Apply the definitions and examples learned (i.e. social class, socioeconomic status, and social class bias/classism) to improve patient outcomes

Session 3: Driving Health Equity Through Care Teams

Jokho Farah, MD
Director of Quality
People's Center Health Services · Minneapolis, MN

ABSTRACT:
What is a Care Team and why is it important? Learn how the People’s Center Health Services built primary care teams and how it has transformed practice. The session will explore how redistributing work among team members enhances team dynamics, creates a culture of shared responsibilities, and leads to better patient care 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  1. Examine current state and determine key team members
  2. Define task and responsibilities and set expectations
  3. Evaluate progress and reinforce with continuous training

Session 4: Supported Decision Making: An Emerging & Ethical Alternative to Guardianship

Anita Raymond, LISW, CMC
Program Manager · Center for Excellence in Supported Decision Making/Protective Services, Care Management and Consultation
Volunteers of America of Minnesota and Wisconsin · Minneapolis, MN

ABSTRACT:
Often when we are working with vulnerable adults with questionable decision-making capacity, we turn to guardianship as a mechanism to ensure basic and safety needs are met. However, we may neglect to consider that it is also a sweeping tool with significant consequences for the person needing help. This session will describe challenges of guardianship and introduce an emerging model, Supported Decision Making (SDM), as both a tool and a philosophy to balance the right to self-determination with the right to be safe. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  1. Explore why guardianship may be both overly burdensome and overprotective
  2. Describe the decision to seek guardianship from ethical, legal, and practical perspectives
  3. Understand how the person-centered approach of SDM protects individual rights while still protecting those who are vulnerable to maltreatment

Session 5: Implementing Primary-Specialty Care Coordination Partnerships for Complex CYSHN

Dianne Burd, MSW, LICSW
Manager · Child and Family Services
Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare · St. Paul, MN

ABSTRACT:
Primary-specialty care coordination for complex CYSHN requires partnerships between health systems, community resources, and most importantly, families. A model incorporating these partnerships for complex CYSHN living in rural Minnesota or recent immigrants with limited English proficiency was implemented two and a half years ago at Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare. Challenges, successes, and lessons learned, from the family, primary care and specialty care perspectives will be presented, including; developing the shared plan of care, communicating effectively across settings, establishing relationships with families, and understanding expectations of the care coordination relationship. Systems support mapping, a process that helps families identify needs and goals, will be introduced 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  1. Understand challenges and successes of families of CYSHN living in rural areas and newly immigrated and limited English proficient families
  2. Discuss the development of a shared plan of care that incorporates important child and family information and goals, health-related information and goals, and school and community resources
  3. Determine processes that facilitate communication and coordination between primary care and specialty care

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May 12, 2017

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